New Jersey is slowly rejecting the two-party system. Voter participation and congressional approval ratings are both at record lows. Yet the courts have issued interpretations of election law that discriminate in favor of the two establishment political parties.

The establishment political parties are guaranteed the first two columns on every ballot. Meanwhile, the Libertarian Party (the third-largest and fastest-growing party) is “lucky” to receive the third column and is often relegated to the fifth or sixth column. This is unfair. All political parties should be treated equally under the law during the construction of the ballot.

Libertarian congressional candidate Dorit Goikhman’s campaign team discovered unlawful practices in vendor admission to Marlboro Day. When the Marlboro Day staff was contacted about setting up a stand at the event, the township representative denied access on the grounds that political candidates could not attend the event, unless “you’re with the mayor.”

Several days prior, a representative from Goikhman’s campaign was told that political parties could attend Marlboro Day, but that individual candidates were barred. Such regulations violate the First Amendment of the Constitution, as all political entities should be allowed equal representation in public forums. Independent candidates, who are unaffiliated with a specific party, are automatically denied access by this requirement.

For Immediate Release
Contact: NJLP State Chair Patrick McKnight 609-915-7200
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

July 31, 2014

Old Established Political Parties Have Lost
Their Preferential Ballot Position

For far too long the old established political parties have enjoyed preferential ballot placement. The two left-most columns have been reserved for the Democrats and Republicans. This year the Democrats and Republicans will be losing this discriminatory electoral advantage as a result of the failure of the old parties to maintain support with the public.

New Jersey law requires that to have a party column, a political party must “poll at any primary election for a general election of at least ten per centum (10%) of the votes cast in the State for members of the General Assembly at the next preceding general election.”

For Immediate Release:
Contact: Charles Barr, 732-470-9994
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
June 15, 2014

Hoboken, NJ – On Thursday June 19th, the Hudson County Republican Club Young Professionals will be hosting “The Great Debate: Libertarian versus Neo-Conservative.”

The debate will explore two influential groups within the American political discourse and their perspectives on a range of issues facing the nation.

The debate participants are Dorit Goikhman, the NJ Libertarian Party State Vice Chair and Libertarian candidate for NJ CD 6 and Joshua Sotomayor-Einstein, SaveJersey.com contributor and conservative essayist. Moderating the debate is Daniel Bono, active member of the Hudson County Republican Club and Hudson County Committeeman.

In the November 2014 election the NJ Libertarian Party will be running candidates under the Libertarian Party banner. The following candidates have successfully petitioned to be on the ballot:

 Please provide whatever support you can to our candidates!

I urge everyone to vote NO on Ballot Question #2.

Ballot question number 2 amends the State Constitution, increasing the minimum wage to $8.25 as of January 1, 2014 and enacts a yearly increase in the minimum wage based on the consumer price index.

Minimum wage laws do absolutely nothing to increase the wealth of poor people. Minimum wage laws reduce the employability of the young and the unskilled. No employer will hire someone at a loss. These laws block individuals from accepting a wage where they can increase their skills and build up a resume. This produces endemic poverty among those who are barred from entering the labor force at a wage commensurate with their skills. On the job training is an essential tool for those unable to afford post-secondary college to increase their employability and income. The bottom rungs of the economic ladder get cut off for many who are just entering the workforce. The harm that minimum wage laws cause is concentrated among the most vulnerable, the young, minorities, and the disabled. 

Ballot question number 1 will amend the NJ State Constitution to expand the exemption of those allowed to run games of chance to include veterans groups. Currently only senior citizen groups and approved casinos and racetracks are allowed to compete against the state by running gambling events.

This question gives another special interest an exception to engage in a consensual activity. Left out of the exception is for you or me. Workplace pools, bowling league games of chance, or wagers between friends remain illegal.

Government should not be engaging in favoritism among some groups and punishment of others for for engaging in consensual betting. Rather such activity should be completely unregulated by our state. The only role the government should have when it comes to gambling is preventing theft and fraud.

I will be voting for this ballot question – but only halfheartedly.